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Balloon dilation performs poorly as a salvage management strategy for recurrent bulbar urethral strictures following failed urethroplasty

  
@article{TAU28551,
	author = {Yooni A. Yi and Alexander T. Rozanski and Nabeel A. Shakir and Boyd R. Viers and Ellen E. Ward and Rachel L. Bergeson and Allen F. Morey},
	title = {Balloon dilation performs poorly as a salvage management strategy for recurrent bulbar urethral strictures following failed urethroplasty},
	journal = {Translational Andrology and Urology},
	volume = {0},
	number = {0},
	year = {2019},
	keywords = {},
	abstract = {Background: The optimal management strategy for recurrent urethral stricture disease (USD) following urethroplasty remains undefined. We aim to evaluate the role and efficacy of endoscopic urethral balloon dilation in temporizing recurrent USD after failed urethroplasty. 
Methods: Between 2007–2018 at our institution, 80 patients underwent balloon dilation procedures for bulbomembranous urethral strictures. Balloon dilation was performed with an 8-cm, 24-French UroMax Ultra™ balloon dilator, under direct vision, guided by a 16-French flexible cystoscope. Patients who underwent concomitant open or endoscopic urethral procedures were excluded. Treatment failure was defined as the need for subsequent surgical intervention for stricture recurrence. Stricture characteristics including etiology, length, location, severity stage, and prior surgical procedures were compared between patients with and without treatment failure. 
Results: Failure cases were more likely to have strictures following urethroplasty (21/27, 78%) [vs. the no-failure group (27/53, 51%)]. Among the 27/80 (33.8%) failures with a median follow-up of 8.4 months (IQR, 3.9–22.5 months), median time to recurrence was 4 months (IQR, 2–12 months). These patients had a greater incidence of prior stricture intervention in general (P=0.01) and prior urethroplasty specifically (P=0.03). On multivariable analysis, the number of prior treatments specifically independently remained associated with treatment failure. Complications of balloon dilation were uncommon (6/80, 7.5%) and minor in nature. 
Conclusions: Endoscopic balloon dilation performs poorly as a salvage strategy after failed open urethral reconstruction in addition to prior urethral dilations.},
	issn = {2223-4691},	url = {http://tau.amegroups.com/article/view/28551}
}