Article Abstract

An overview of publicly available patient-centered prostate cancer datasets

Authors: Tim Hulsen

Abstract

Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common cancer in men, and the second leading cause of death from cancer in men. Many studies on PCa have been carried out, each taking much time before the data is collected and ready to be analyzed. However, on the internet there is already a wide range of PCa datasets available, which could be used for data mining, predictive modelling or other purposes, reducing the need to setup new studies to collect data. In the current scientific climate, moving more and more to the analysis of “big data” and large, international, multi-site projects using a modern IT infrastructure, these datasets could be proven extremely valuable. This review presents an overview of publicly available patient-centered PCa datasets, divided into three categories (clinical, genomics and imaging) and an “overall” section to enable researchers to select a suitable dataset for analysis, without having to go through days of work to find the right data. To acquire a list of human PCa databases, scientific literature databases and academic social network sites were searched. We also used the information from other reviews. All databases in the combined list were then checked for public availability. Only databases that were either directly publicly available or available after signing a research data agreement or retrieving a free login were selected for inclusion in this review. Data should be available to commercial parties as well. This paper focuses on patient-centered data, so the genomics data section does not include gene-centered databases or pathway-centered databases. We identified 42 publicly available, patient-centered PCa datasets. Some of these consist of different smaller datasets. Some of them contain combinations of datasets from the three data domains: clinical data, imaging data and genomics data. Only one dataset contains information from all three domains. This review presents all datasets and their characteristics: number of subjects, clinical fields, imaging modalities, expression data, mutation data, biomarker measurements, etc. Despite all the attention that has been given to making this overview of publicly available databases as extensive as possible, it is very likely not complete, and will also be outdated soon. However, this review might help many PCa researchers to find suitable datasets to answer the research question with, without the need to start a new data collection project. In the coming era of big data analysis, overviews like this are becoming more and more useful.